February 8, 2019

How to Protect Yourself While Working in the Garden

Today I have a post from Nadya Jones from Allen Roth HQ. Here is her post about protecting ourselves when we are out there digging in the dirt!


 How to Protect Yourself While Working in the Garden:
Are you worried about the effects that exposing yourself to the hot summer sun could be having on your skin? If you live in one of the warmer parts of the US, such as Tennessee, and you love gardening, you may well find yourself regularly concerned about issues such as sunburn, heatstroke and even longer term skin conditions.

How can you protect yourself? Our top tips are designed to help keep you safe in the sun.

Shade

The shade is your best friend when working in the garden. You must have a shaded area. If you are going to do activities which can be done anywhere in the garden then choose the shade. For instance, pot plants in the shade and then move them into position. Even birds try to stay in the shade when the sun is beating down on them!

You can even make the shade come with you, with a pop-up canopy. These can be easily moved around and don’t have to cost a huge amount. Just ensure you have a canopy with adequate UV protection.

Apply (and Reapply) Sunscreen


Protecting your skin is vital. Apply sunscreen 30 minutes before you’re going to be out in the garden, and then reapply every two hours. This is advice given by Skin Cancer experts. Even if it is cloudy outside, the sun can still have negative effects on your skin.

Some people think that the sun doesn’t have an impact on their skin due to the fact they don’t visibly burn, but this doesn’t mean the rays aren’t having a long term impact. Everybody needs to wear sunscreen, any age, any skin type.

Avoid The Hottest Hours


The sun’s rays are at their most powerful close to midday. 10 am until 3 pm is normally the warmest time in the day, and noon is when the sun is highest. Avoiding being outside at this time, if you can, is wise.

If you can get up nice and early to do your garden work, before the sun is high in the sky, you are less susceptible to burns or heat-based illnesses.

Adequate Clothing


A hat can provide some shade and a cooling effect. Don’t worry about getting a fashionable hat, just choose the best for protection. This may mean a good old fashioned straw hat.

Sunglasses with UV protection are another good way to protect your face and eyes from the perils of the sun.

As well as these accessories, loose-fitting clothes which won’t keep all the heat packed in can help you to avoid overheating.

Check the UV Forecast


Some people don’t even know that this exists. Most weather channels and websites will show you the UV forecast which is based on the strength of UV rays which are likely to be in your area.

Check websites such as Sunburn Map for reading in your location. Just like the main weather, it isn’t 100% reliable, but it gives a good idea of how the conditions may be. This doesn’t mean that you can ignore precautions, but lower UV rays will lower the risk.

Conclusion

Have you enjoyed our post? Are you ready to get the most out of your garden without having to worry too much about the effects of the sun? Feel free to share our tips with those who will find it useful, or leave your own advice in the comments. Are you worried about the effects that exposing yourself to the hot summer sun could be having on your skin? If you live in one of the warmer parts of the US, such as Tennessee, and you love gardening, you may well find yourself regularly concerned about issues such as sunburn, heatstroke and even longer term skin conditions.


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